SOULTales - Character Strengths, Stories & Vocabulary

Friday, January 20, 2017

Integrity - The 3 Diamonds - Tamil folktale

Integrity - Is being true to ourselves. Only if we are true with ourselves can we aim to be true to others. So there is  a big element of Self Awareness and Self Respect involved in this. Only if we have this character strength will others trust us. Integrity is about walking the talk!

http://www.wisdomcommons.org/virtue/76-integrity/parables

Folktales have handled Integrity in many ways - cautionary tales that tell you what happens when Integrity is lost. Some tales use sacrifice to illustrate Integrity, where the Hero/ Heroine have to give up something in order to keep their word.
Some wonderful tales such as Punyakoti the Cow and Arputha the Tiger. Though the original version tells us that the tiger jumped off a cliff and sacrificed himself, in order to atone for his sin of desiring such a  virtuous cow as Punyakoti, others have adapted this tale (called as disordered narrative), to have the tiger let go of the cow, in peace.

Another tale is the Boiled Seeds ( Empty Pot story) that is supposed to be Chinese in origin, which tells us about  a little boy who becomes the emperor for he admits that he could not grow anything from the seeds given to him and it turns out they were boiled seeds.

This particular story called : The 3 Diamonds; is a Tamil folktale.
There is an online version by David Heathfield which I have used for my reference. I like this story at many levels for it shows that integrity can exist even in a person who seems to have done something wrong. Yet to evaluate what it means to us is of utmost importance -which is being true and honest to ourselves is more important than any other strength.

Vocabulary for Use

trustworthy
upright
genuine
authentic



The 3 Diamonds (adapted)
In a village lived a young boy with his grandmother. Having lost his father and mother at a very young age, he was raised by his grandmother and also being poor and with no other means he had turned to robbing as his profession. Weary of his ways, his grandmother begged and pleaded with him to give up robbing or take up an honest trade or atleast to speak the truth.

The young boy confessed that he robbed to feed themselves and as he knew no other trade the only thing he could do was choose the last. He vowed he would always speak the truth even though he followed a dishonest profession.
One day as he was out on his usual rounds looking for a house to rob, he came across a beggar.
Let me tell you that this beggar was actually the Rajah in disguise who ventured out of his palace at times to understand the people of his kingdom.

"Where are you going?" asked the beggar to the thief.

Remember his vow to his grandmother? Well he had to tell the truth to the beggar. So he told the beggar his plan to enter the Rajah's palace and steal something from there.

"HaHaHa, the Rajah's palace? Well I can help you there, Come with me." said the beggar and he took the thief to a street adjacent to the palace and told him in a hushed tone to enter when the guards were changing and to go right to the Rajah's throne room. Once inside, he was to look for a box under the Rajah's throne and to open it for inside that he would find a treasure.

The thief expertly entered the palace and quickly made his way to the Rajah's throne room. Just as the beggar had said he found a box under the throne and when he opened it he saw....

3 shining priceless diamonds!!

He picked up all 3, but just at that moment he hesitated and asked himself the question: "Do I need all 3 diamonds. Even one will give me a lot of money with which I can take care of my grandmother and myself"

Having had this thought and it being a truthful one, he left one in the box and took only two with him and left the same way he had come.

Outside the palace he met the beggar. "Did you find the treasure?" asked the beggar.

 "Yes I did. Thank you for your help and it is only correct that I share this with you" he said and gave one diamond to the beggar and quickly left from there..

The beggar followed the thief silently and saw him enter his humble hut at the edge of the town.

The beggar now went back to his own place. Yes! Went back to the palace.

The next morning he called his Mantri and said: "There has been a robbery last night, search the palace and find out what is missing".

The Mantri searched the throne room thoroughly and soon found the box under the throne open and two of the diamonds missing. "The thief appears to have taken only 2 diamonds, what a strange fellow" he said and quietly instead placed the diamond in his own pocket.

"Rajah the diamonds are missing" he announced grandly and showed the empty box.

"Empty?" asked the Rajah

"Yes. Most definitely" said the Mantri.

"The thief lives in a hut at the edge of town, go and bring him to the Town square immediately. Justice will be done" said the King wisely.

The Mantri hurried to the hut and quickly dragged the thief to the Town Square where the Rajah too reached very soon.

A guard stood ready to chop off the thief's head and the whole town had gathered to see the tamasha.

"Have you stolen 3 diamonds from under the King's throne?"asked the Mantri

"Yes I have stolen, but I took only two, not three" said the thief, for he had vowed to tell the truth to his grandmother.

"Liar" shouted the Mantri, "Which thief takes two when he can take three, show them to us"

" I have one here with me but the other I gave it to a beggar for helping me"

"Again you lie, which thief shares his loot. Off with his head" Shouted the Mantri almost hysterically.

"Wait, he tells the truth. I was the beggar in disguise to whom he gave the diamond" said the Rajah to the shocked people as he opened his palm to show the other diamond.

"As for the third diamond, I think I know who may have it. Guards, search our Mantri's pocket inside out" said the Rajah.

Correctly enough the guards found the third diamond in the Mantri's pocket.

"People of my land, tell me who should I punish now? This scoundrel Mantri or the honest thief?" asked the king.

"The Mantri must be punished and the thief rewarded" yelled the people in one voice.

"This boy's honesty and integrity is worthy of him becoming my advisor, so let him decide what is to be done to the other" said the Rajah.

" Everybody deserves another chance, so let him go, but let him be stripped of all his status and wealth. Let him know what it is to be poor. I too have made mistakes and this is my second chance. I promise to tell the truth always and to serve this land under your wise rule Oh Rajah" said the new advisor.

~~~~












Saturday, January 14, 2017

Prudence & Good Judgement - Folktale from Kashmir - Secret of Traamkhazaan (Tulika Publishers)


Prudence or discretion: A character strength that enables you to do and say things that is well thought out and not hasty. This strength allows you to make choices that you will not regret later.
It falls under the strength of Temperance and allows us practice the ability to monitor and manage our feelings, motivations and behaviour, and protects us from excess.

Cautious wisdom, practical wisdom and practical reason.


Vocabulary to Use

good judgement
judicious
cautious
common sense


This folktale lends easily to the concept of practicing prudence. Here I have adapted it for telling without taking away the essence of the story. One can always read out the original story from the book as well.


Secret of Traamkhazaan- Folktale from Kashmir –
Taken from the book:
 The Enchanted Saarang 
 Tulika Publishers (Asha Hanley & Proiti Roy)



Adapted for telling here:

Traamkhazaan, Traamkhazaan, Secret treasures in a copper bowl.
Fazli and Humza chanted the lines as they drove their sheep up the mountain which was known to everyone as the Traamkhazaan – Copper Treasure Mountain. It was summer in the mountains and delicious new grass could be found way up on the slopes and that’s where the brother and sister had to take their sheep.
Down below was their dera or camp where families had made their tents and lived together as a community. Mother had packed some lunch for the two of them, rice, spinach, meat and yummy yellow paneer – fried into a golden brown which they carried in a bowl tied up with a cloth.
“Do you think this mountain has secrets and treasures?”Asked Fazli to her brother
“I sure wish it had some treasure for us to find. Then we can give some of it to Abba and he will not have to worry about the winter cold”
Drrr.....Drr...said Hamza as he drove the sheep higher up the slope.
Just as they turned the corner they were shocked to a standstill as they saw a short man standing there, leaning against a rock. He had a grey hair and a grey beard and a rope around his waist just like all the shepherds on the mountain.
“As salaam alaikum bhaisaab. Are you new here? We have never seen you before. Are you a shepherd?” asked Hamza politely.
“I am looking for something, have you ever looked for anything on this mountain?” the stranger asked
“Not really, only sheep and sometimes we look for mushrooms. What are you looking for?”
“A Treasure” said the grey bearded man looking at Fazli and Humza with a twinkle on his eyes.
“Treasure! But that is just a story”, said Fazli
‘Maybe and maybe not...but before that can you give me some food, I am very hungry”
Humza and Fazli had just enough food for the two of them, but in a jiffy, Fazli decided to share the food they had brought along with them. She opened her cloth packet and took out the two bowls of food. The stranger rubbed his hands in delight
“Yummm, this is my favourite food, rice, meat and paneer” and he gobbled up all the food as the two watched him.
Just as quickly as he finished eating, he waved goodbye, thanked them and disappeared around the mountain path as Fazli and Humza stared at each other.
How were they going to explain this to their Mother? No food and nothing to show for their kindness. It was going to be along day.
As the sun set in the western horizon, Fazli and Humza who had eaten nothing but a few berries picked up from the mountain and drunk from the cool mountain spring, made their way back down the slope while trying to count all their sheep.
Suddenly a rustle between the bushes caused the sheep to bleat loudly in fear and huddle together.
Was it a snake or could it be a leapord they wondered and quickly Hamza held his stick firmly in his hand.
The man with the grey hair and grey beard stood once more before them. He also had a peculiar shining copper bowl in his hand.
“Here, you may have this”, he said with a grin.
Fazli’s eyes literally popped out. Was this the copper treasure that could be found on these mountains? She reached out and took the bowl in her hand; it looked so pretty and shiny.
She ran her finger along the smooth edge of the bowl and “cling” a golden coin fell into the bowl.
The old man smiled at them and said “This is a magic bowl. But as you were kind and generous, the Spirit of the Copper Mountain will give you what you wish for. But remember
“Never Ever wish anyone ill, for if you do, the wish will come true, but the bowl will fly over the hill”
“Why should we wish anyone ill? We are so lucky to have this bowl that we will wish for all good things!” promised Hamza and Fazli.
Even before they finished speaking, the old man disappeared and the two drove their sheep back home.
~~~
It all seemed like a dream when they woke up the next morning. But can two people have the same dream?
“I saw an old man”
“Me too, and he appeared and disappeared like magic!”
“He also told a rhyme....mmmm...something about wish and ill and fly over the hill?”
Never Ever wish anyone Ill, for the wish will come true, but the bowl will fly over the hill” said Hamza who always had a great memory for words.
“But is he real? Is he the Spirit of the TraamKhazaan Mountain? Will the bowl give us what we wish for?”
Questions tumbled out of Fazli’s mouth, but the copper bowl was there, right in front of them and their only proof they had not dreamed the whole thing up.
“Come let us tell Abba what happened and let us show him the bowl”
With a quick splash of icy cold water, they rushed towards their father’s tent.
But there was someone with their father and the two of them looked very solemn.
“Do you remember Sarai, you played with her last summer?” Said the visitor once he saw them at the entrance and gestured them to come in.
“She is very sick and we are all worried for her. We can only pray now”
Hamza and Fazli looked at each other and they both had the same idea it seemed, for when they stepped out of the tent almost together they both spoke about the magic Copper Bowl.
“Shall we rub the bowl and wish for Sarai’s good health?”
“We can try, but last time it gave money, I am not sure it will give her good health now”
But without any more talking, Fazli, rubbed the rim of the copper bowl and made a wish under her breathe. The watched and watched for something to happen, but nothing did.
Disheartened they had to start the evening duties and soon went over to their mother for some roti and noonchai.
~
Next morning the two decided to visit Sarai and made the long trek down the hill.
As they neared the dera, they were surprised, in fact shocked to see Sarai sitting outside her tent with a shawl around her shoulders and actually smiling at them.
“It is a miracle” said Sarai’s mother. “She was very sick last night, but this morning she got up and sat down like everything was fine and she has even asked for some roti and chai!”
“Spirit of Traamkhazaan, Thank you”, said Fazli under her breathe and when no elder was around they even shared their wonderful secret with Sarai, their friend.
But not everyone can believe all that is told to them and Sarai was of that nature.
~
“Spirit? Copper Bowl? What rubbish! How could he cure me? Does he speak Kashmiri?” she interrogated them and asked them many many questions. Finally she forced them to show the magic bowl to her.
Hamza looked at Fazli and both of them knew they must not tell Sarai about the gold. So when he brought the copper bowl from where he had hidden it, he quietly gave t to Fazli, who thought of the first thing that came to her mind and gently rubbed the edge of the copper bowl.
A large blob of yummy white paneer fell into the bowl, much to Sarai’s amazement!
They waved goodbye to Sarai and left back for their dera, but did not realise that they had left Sarai, thinking and thinking.
The next morning Sarai left her home very early and walked all the way to Fazli and Humza’s dera way up on the hills. She waited for them to leave their tent and drive the sheep further away and quickly when no one was looking went into their tent.
Simple children that Fazli and Humza were they had left the copper bowl just under their folded clothes and in no time Sarai had found the bowl.
“You are my slave now, you have to obey me, and give me whatever I ask” said greedy Sarai and wished loudly for some yummy Buffalo milk paneer, the same that she had seen Fazli do the previous evening.
To her surprise and horror, the bowl became hotter and hotter and just flew right out of her hands banged her nose once and flew out of the window and far away. At the same moment a piece of hot paneer fell into her mouth and her mouth clamped shut around this blob of hot food, that it burnt her tongue and made her cry out.
She ran out of the tent and back home gasping for breath and clutching her throat. She refused to eat paneer from that day onwards and thought twice before she wished ill of someone.
While back on the hills, the copper bowl flew right to where Fazli and Humza were grazing the sheep and landed at their feet. The Spirit of Traamkhazaan had given the bowl back to those who would use it with prudence, the kind and helpful brother and sister.
Traamkhazaan, Traamkhazaan, Secret treasures in a copper bowl.
“Never Ever wish anyone Ill, for the wish will come true, but the bowl will fly over the hill”
The two used the bowl for many other important things in their family and every time made sure it would be a helpful act.





Monday, December 19, 2016

Grit and Perseverance - The Legend of the Koi - Chinese tale

Grit & Perseverance - Voluntary goal oriented behaviour, despite obstacles, disappointments, difficulties and discouragements.The ability to continue taking the right actions that lead us towards our goals despite setbacks and brickbats. This trait falls within the sphere of Courage.

Some of the ways to develop this trait is to have a role model and mentor who can guide either in person or in spirit. This trait can also be developed by setting small simple weekly goals and achieving them on a regular basis. This particular value/trait is ranked highest amongst all traits to possess and is associated with delayed gratification in its ability to predict success.

King Bruce and the Spider is a classic legend set in medieval Scotland that brings out this value to perfection.  
Mathematician Andrew Wiles had a 30 year obsession with Fermats Last theoram and spent 7 relentless years to finally arrive at a solution. Grit; Plays a major role in shaping people's life!





Vocabulary to Use

determination
tenacity
guts
courage 
resolute
resolve


You can listen to an audio of this story here:


The Legend of the Koi Fish - a Tale from China ( adapted )

A very long time ago, there flowed a yellow river on earth and from where it met the horizon, flowed a blue river to the sky. The two were separated by the Dragon Gate and what lay yonder on the blue river was the magical Great Waterfall.

Every fish in the river dreams of swimming through the yellow river and reaching the other side. But this was an arduous task, for the water flowed upstream and many fish gave up even before they started. 
...Except for one little fish called Blue Koi, who lived in the yellow river along with his gorgeous and elegant Father Black Koi and Mother Red Koi.

This little remarkably deep Blue Koi had a heart of its own. He wished to swim upstream and reach the Great Waterfall, for he had heard from his Father that all those who could get to the other side would grow wings and become transformed into a Dragon Fish. So he dreamed of becoming one.

The current was strong when Blue Koi started flapping his fins. He flapped and flapped and pushed himself as much as possible. Gradually he progressed up the river towards his goal.

Yet his loud flapping attracted the Gods who were guardians of the blue river. They peered down from the skies to see this iridescent Koi swimming with such focus. They did not like it one bit. They did not want any more newcomers to their river and definitely not such a small Koi fish. They clapped their hands and suddenly the River Mouth Monster emerged from the deepest part of the yellow river and stood ready with his mouth open for he could swallow anything that crossed its path.

The Blue Koi was taken unawares and found himself dragged into the deep cavernous mouth of the river monster. But he was alert and watchful and that is how he noticed the tiny holes on the skin of the River Mouth Monster, just big enough for him to squeeze through and with renewed effort, he bravely swam through the tiny pore and escaped from the hurdle placed in front of him.
Again he flapped and flapped and pushed as much as possible.

Now the Gods were eager to test him once more, so with a swish of their hands they churned the yellow river so badly that Blue Koi could see nothing. Dirt and dredge floated around him and he flapped helplessly trying to see ahead. He waited patiently for the dirt to settle down, which it did after a long while and then once again Blue Koi resumed his flapping. Some would say that the Wind God was impressed by him and sent a gentle and calming breeze to settle the water, while some say the Blue Koi Fish was himself so patient that finally the river did settle down.
Yet again he kept flapping and flapping as much as possible.

Now Blue Koi could feel a different tension on his fins, he knew he was nearing the Dragon Gate, the water was flowing very differently. Bump! His head touched something hard and the water too had reduced to a thin trickle. He looked around and noticed there was yet again another hurdle in his way. A huge wall stood in front of him and beyond that he could hear the gurgling and gushing of the Great Waterfall.

“I am almost there, except that I have to cross this wall. How can I do this?” both excited and exhausted at the same time, Blue Koi muttered.
The Gods had created a huge wall in front of the Dragon Gate and the Blue Koi had only one way to cross this hurdle. He had to JUMP, even though he was tired and exhausted. He had to make this final effort.

Taking a deep breath (in fish that would be flapping harder), Blue Koi jumped as high as he could. He only splashed back into the water. Again and again he jumped and then jumped yet again. The Gods laughed, but he was relentless. Every time he fell down, he flapped his fins and jumped right back. This went on for very long.

Finally the Gods who till now were testing him, feeling great admiration for him, quickly summoned the River God to create a huge wave that carried little Koi right up and over the wall and through the Dragon Gate. He had made it with a lot of effort and whole lot of perseverance! 

The Blue Koi looked at himself and realised that as he crossed the Golden Gate he had been transformed. Elegant paper thin, colourful wings now adorned his two sides and he had become a true Dragon Fish. He floated in that calm water with abandon.

Though he would remain a Blue Koi in his heart, he could always become a Dragon Fish whenever he wanted. Through sheer, hardwork, perseverance and focus, the little Blue Koi had become a Dragon Fish.